Return to the Blog Home Page

Posts Tagged ‘pergola’

Fall is for Planting

Thursday, November 14th, 2013

Fall is for Planting

japangarden

One of the great things about fall in the South is the weather. The “dog days” of summer have passed and cooler temperatures make working in the garden an appealing option. Fall is also an ideal time to add plants to your garden, including trees, shrubs, perennials and spring flowering bulbs. Whether you have a small city courtyard or a large suburban lot, the possibilities are unlimited.

Start with a Plan

drawing
If you don’t already have a landscape plan for your garden, Gibbs Landscape Company can create one tailored to suit your property and life style.

The Framework: Trees, Shrubs and Perennials

Seasonal Color

If you have taken photos throughout the growing season of plants that you like, or made notes about favorites, now is the time to add these to your garden. Remember, you are investing in a root system. When adding trees and shrubs, consider what they will look like in every season and which perennial companions will complement them.

Be sure to include a mixture of both evergreen and deciduous types. This way your garden will offer interest throughout the year.

Beyond blooms, choose varieties with interesting texture, colorful bark, brilliant berries and fragrant qualities. For screening and hedging, plants like fragrant tea olive, Osmanthus fragrans, offer bold evergreen foliage and sweetly scented flowers.

Don’t forget the Bulbs

flower blubs

Once the soil temperatures are cooler (November through December) it’s time to add spring flowering bulbs. For easy to grow perennial bulbs, daffodils are a good bet. Pair them with daylilies or hellebores which will help mask daffodil foliage, after they have flowered and as it ripens next summer. Because daffodils are poisonous, deer will avoid them. (Once 1/3 of the foliage has turned yellow you can cut it back).

Smaller species bulbs like the tulip ‘Lady Jane’ or Ipheion ‘Rolf Fiedler,’ with its fragrant lavender blue flowers, are ideal for tucking into the flower border or under established shrubs and trees. Unlike the giant hybrid tulips, both of these varieties will persist in the garden, delighting you for years to come.

Instant Color with Container Gardens

picture-683

 If your garden space is limited or you just want to add a burst of color, containers are a quick and easy fix. Don’t limit yourself, combine perennials, shrubs and trees too. Evergreens and small conifers like dwarf selections of hinoki cypress, Chameacyparis obtusa are good candidates that offer year around beauty. For more color, leave room to add annuals that you can replace, depending on the season.

Don’t forget to water your new plantings on a regular basis until they become established.

 

For more ideas on how to transform your Fall garden, contact Gibbs Landscape Company and one of our award winning landscape architects would be happy to assist you.

As winners of over 275 awards, Gibbs Landscape Company offers a proven track record of creative, quality landscape design and maintenance. Our team of highly trained, qualified Landscape Architects and horticulturalist can design and maintain a landscape that will add value to your property for years to come. You deserve the best in landscape design/build and maintenance…you deserve Gibbs Landscape Company.

Be sure to follow us on Facebook to discover more great landscape tips & photos!
Logo-Facebook_image_full

Transform Your Shade Garden

Thursday, March 14th, 2013

As spring approaches and trees begin to leaf out, is your shady landscape looking lackluster? Or, maybe where once you had sun, trees have matured and now you have shade. With the right plants and a creative design, shade can be an asset and your garden an oasis, on those hot summer days we experience in Georgia. This can be accomplished by including a variety of plants with interesting textures, colorful foliage and even blooms!

Pair Foliage and Flowers

Shade Garden WalkwayWhen you select a shrub for screening or an evergreen backdrop, think about what you will pair it with. The tough yet elegant Florida Leucothoe,Agarista populifolia, is ideal for screening unsightly views and has a graceful fountain shape. By planting a small Japanese maple in front of the Leucothoe and adding a landscape boulder, you have created a lovely scene that offers interest for months. A clump of iris adds colorful flowers and a vertical accent even after it blooms. Another plant that makes a good companion for Florida Leucothoe is the oakleaf hydrangea, Hydrangea quercifolia. The white flowers open in early summer and last for weeks. The ornamental bark, dark brown to cinnamon, looks good year around. And, you don’t have to prune this hydrangea unless it gets too big for the spot you have it growing in.

Variegated Solomon's Seal and CephalotaxusSmall anise tree, Illicium parviflorum, provides bold foliage and grows in sun or shade. With a span of 8 to 10 ft. high and wide, Anise is perfect for an evergreen screen or an informal hedge. It provides the perfect backdrop for shrubs like Annabelle hydrangeas, which bloom in June with large white delicate blooms (4 to 6 inches across and up to 12 inches in diameter). This hydrangea produces flower buds on current season’s growth so each year you should get an abundance of flowers, provided you provide a moist, fertile soil and regular fertilization. For summer color that persists for months, Variegated Solomon’s Seal, Polygonatum odoratum ‘Variegatum,’ brightens even the darkest corner with its variegated foliage (leaves up to 6 inches long), soft green leaves edged in creamy white. This perennial will grow in shade or part sun. Other blooming perennials that are happy in the shade include Fringed Bleeding Heart, Dicentra ‘Luxuriant’. With its cherry-red flowers and blue-green delicate looking foliage, this is a good performer.

Right Plant, Right Place
For a foundation planting that won’t require constant pruning to keep it in check,
Japanese plum yew, Cephalotaxus harringtonia ‘Prostrata,’ offers dark green needled foliage. This shrub grows 1 and ½ to 2 feet high and 4 to 5 feet wide, ideal for in front of windows. For a contrast, add some autumn fern and you have an elegant duo that won’t threaten to obscure your view (from inside your home looking out to your landscape). For even more color, add Hellebores and early daffodils.

Go Vertical
Whether you train them to frame your front door, or cover an arbor that welcomes visitors to your garden, vines will add vertical interest. There are a number of evergreen vines that thrive in the shade including Carolina Jessamine, Gelsemium sempervirens, with glowing yellow flowers in spring and Confederate jasmine, Trachelospermum jasminoides ‘Madison,’ also blooming in spring but with white fragrant flowers.

For more ideas on how to transform your shade garden, contact Gibbs Landscape Company and one of our award winning landscape architects would be happy to assist you.

Don’t miss the world’s Largest Daffodil Display in full bloom now at Gibbs Gardens