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Newsletter September 2015

Tuesday, September 8th, 2015

Fall is just around the corner and we have already felt a slight change in the weather with cooler mornings and a brief relief from the heat. Fescue lawns will be replenished with fescue seed this month beginning in September and continuing into October.  Aeration, seeding and fertilizing the Fescue lawns will take place by our Horticultural Services Division. Irrigation systems will need to be in top working condition to provide full coverage of water to the lawns to germinate the seed. We will be lowering the Fescue lawns prior to the seeding and after seeding Fescue lawns will not be mowed for 4-6 weeks. The fescue will get tall as we allow the new seed to germinate and grow in before we make our first cut. Irrigation run times and days to be watered will be set by Gibbs Team Managers.  The goal is to keep the turf evenly moist and that typically requires daily watering of the turf for the first 2-3 weeks. Our grass seed as always is a three seed fescue blend, blue tag certified (99.99% weed free) and delivered straight from the turf field plots in Oregon. Growing grass from seed is a delicate and necessary task and will be our only chance to replenish the lawns with new seed over this 1-2 month window.

Besides being grass farmers this month the crews are working on deadheading and cleaning perennial beds and plants. A great deal of perennials are being cut back to the ground leaving foliage exposed at the soil line. This is the last month for summer annuals. Hydrangeas will be deadheaded after their spent blooms have become undesirable. Knock out roses will continue to bloom through September but this is typically their last blooming cycle.  Some annuals have started to depart and will need to be removed. Fall annuals will be scheduled for October.

Turf diseases and insects will continually be monitored.  Brown patch fungus on fescue will be subsiding as we see cooler and less humid days and nights. Grub worms and Army worms have been found just recently but very isolated and extremely small populations. We could be on the cusp for a breakout of Army worms and the crews and managers are well aware and on the lookout.  Army worms can decimate a lawn in 24-72 hours.  We are armed with a very special environmentally friendly insecticide that will target the Army worms and Grubs and not affect other beneficial insects.

School is back in session and we want all of you to know that we go through great lengths to ensure that our drivers are safe on the roads and at your properties. We submit driving tests to all of our drivers, road and written tests and complete point inspections of our trucks and equipment daily.

If you are interested in our award winning services please call us at 770-432-7761 or fill out request a quote section of webpage.

Fall is for Planting

Thursday, November 14th, 2013

Fall is for Planting

japangarden

One of the great things about fall in the South is the weather. The “dog days” of summer have passed and cooler temperatures make working in the garden an appealing option. Fall is also an ideal time to add plants to your garden, including trees, shrubs, perennials and spring flowering bulbs. Whether you have a small city courtyard or a large suburban lot, the possibilities are unlimited.

Start with a Plan

drawing
If you don’t already have a landscape plan for your garden, Gibbs Landscape Company can create one tailored to suit your property and life style.

The Framework: Trees, Shrubs and Perennials

Seasonal Color

If you have taken photos throughout the growing season of plants that you like, or made notes about favorites, now is the time to add these to your garden. Remember, you are investing in a root system. When adding trees and shrubs, consider what they will look like in every season and which perennial companions will complement them.

Be sure to include a mixture of both evergreen and deciduous types. This way your garden will offer interest throughout the year.

Beyond blooms, choose varieties with interesting texture, colorful bark, brilliant berries and fragrant qualities. For screening and hedging, plants like fragrant tea olive, Osmanthus fragrans, offer bold evergreen foliage and sweetly scented flowers.

Don’t forget the Bulbs

flower blubs

Once the soil temperatures are cooler (November through December) it’s time to add spring flowering bulbs. For easy to grow perennial bulbs, daffodils are a good bet. Pair them with daylilies or hellebores which will help mask daffodil foliage, after they have flowered and as it ripens next summer. Because daffodils are poisonous, deer will avoid them. (Once 1/3 of the foliage has turned yellow you can cut it back).

Smaller species bulbs like the tulip ‘Lady Jane’ or Ipheion ‘Rolf Fiedler,’ with its fragrant lavender blue flowers, are ideal for tucking into the flower border or under established shrubs and trees. Unlike the giant hybrid tulips, both of these varieties will persist in the garden, delighting you for years to come.

Instant Color with Container Gardens

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 If your garden space is limited or you just want to add a burst of color, containers are a quick and easy fix. Don’t limit yourself, combine perennials, shrubs and trees too. Evergreens and small conifers like dwarf selections of hinoki cypress, Chameacyparis obtusa are good candidates that offer year around beauty. For more color, leave room to add annuals that you can replace, depending on the season.

Don’t forget to water your new plantings on a regular basis until they become established.

 

For more ideas on how to transform your Fall garden, contact Gibbs Landscape Company and one of our award winning landscape architects would be happy to assist you.

As winners of over 275 awards, Gibbs Landscape Company offers a proven track record of creative, quality landscape design and maintenance. Our team of highly trained, qualified Landscape Architects and horticulturalist can design and maintain a landscape that will add value to your property for years to come. You deserve the best in landscape design/build and maintenance…you deserve Gibbs Landscape Company.

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Transform Your Shade Garden

Thursday, March 14th, 2013

As spring approaches and trees begin to leaf out, is your shady landscape looking lackluster? Or, maybe where once you had sun, trees have matured and now you have shade. With the right plants and a creative design, shade can be an asset and your garden an oasis, on those hot summer days we experience in Georgia. This can be accomplished by including a variety of plants with interesting textures, colorful foliage and even blooms!

Pair Foliage and Flowers

Shade Garden WalkwayWhen you select a shrub for screening or an evergreen backdrop, think about what you will pair it with. The tough yet elegant Florida Leucothoe,Agarista populifolia, is ideal for screening unsightly views and has a graceful fountain shape. By planting a small Japanese maple in front of the Leucothoe and adding a landscape boulder, you have created a lovely scene that offers interest for months. A clump of iris adds colorful flowers and a vertical accent even after it blooms. Another plant that makes a good companion for Florida Leucothoe is the oakleaf hydrangea, Hydrangea quercifolia. The white flowers open in early summer and last for weeks. The ornamental bark, dark brown to cinnamon, looks good year around. And, you don’t have to prune this hydrangea unless it gets too big for the spot you have it growing in.

Variegated Solomon's Seal and CephalotaxusSmall anise tree, Illicium parviflorum, provides bold foliage and grows in sun or shade. With a span of 8 to 10 ft. high and wide, Anise is perfect for an evergreen screen or an informal hedge. It provides the perfect backdrop for shrubs like Annabelle hydrangeas, which bloom in June with large white delicate blooms (4 to 6 inches across and up to 12 inches in diameter). This hydrangea produces flower buds on current season’s growth so each year you should get an abundance of flowers, provided you provide a moist, fertile soil and regular fertilization. For summer color that persists for months, Variegated Solomon’s Seal, Polygonatum odoratum ‘Variegatum,’ brightens even the darkest corner with its variegated foliage (leaves up to 6 inches long), soft green leaves edged in creamy white. This perennial will grow in shade or part sun. Other blooming perennials that are happy in the shade include Fringed Bleeding Heart, Dicentra ‘Luxuriant’. With its cherry-red flowers and blue-green delicate looking foliage, this is a good performer.

Right Plant, Right Place
For a foundation planting that won’t require constant pruning to keep it in check,
Japanese plum yew, Cephalotaxus harringtonia ‘Prostrata,’ offers dark green needled foliage. This shrub grows 1 and ½ to 2 feet high and 4 to 5 feet wide, ideal for in front of windows. For a contrast, add some autumn fern and you have an elegant duo that won’t threaten to obscure your view (from inside your home looking out to your landscape). For even more color, add Hellebores and early daffodils.

Go Vertical
Whether you train them to frame your front door, or cover an arbor that welcomes visitors to your garden, vines will add vertical interest. There are a number of evergreen vines that thrive in the shade including Carolina Jessamine, Gelsemium sempervirens, with glowing yellow flowers in spring and Confederate jasmine, Trachelospermum jasminoides ‘Madison,’ also blooming in spring but with white fragrant flowers.

For more ideas on how to transform your shade garden, contact Gibbs Landscape Company and one of our award winning landscape architects would be happy to assist you.

Don’t miss the world’s Largest Daffodil Display in full bloom now at Gibbs Gardens

It’s Time to Plant

Thursday, February 7th, 2013

It’s mid-February in the Atlanta area and although spring doesn’t officially start until March 20th, some daffodils and a few trees and shrubs are beginning to flower.
While the weather can be unpredictable and early blooms may be nipped by frost or turned to mush by a late freeze, conditions during February and March are ideal for planting hardy trees, shrubs and some perennials. (Wait until mid-April to plant your summer annuals.)

By getting a jump on the season, you will put less stress on your plants and your budget. The benefits of adding plants to your garden now are that with the cool weather, plants won’t require as much water as they will once the temperatures begin to heat up and leaves desiccate quickly. Think of it as an easy way to save money on your water bill.

If the structure of a deciduous tree or shrub (the framework without the foliage) looks good now, just imagine how it will enhance your landscape once the leaves appear in a month or so. Remember, you’re investing in a healthy root system, in other words, the underground parts that you don’t see are as important as what you do see.

Tree Pruning
Before you plant, take several photos of what your landscape looks like now.
Ask yourself what you like about your garden and note the changes you would like to make. Make notes too about holes in your landscape where the addition of a shrub or tree would make a difference. Consider not only shrubs and trees but perennials that will complement them. Utilizing an experienced landscape architect will insure the proper textures and combinations for your new garden.

This is also a good time to evaluate your hardscape including paths, edging for planting areas, patios, walls, fences, etc. An effective way to tie your garden to your home is to use materials like the materials that your house is constructed of: brick, stone, wood, etc.

Below are a few combinations of shrubs, trees and perennials that make good garden bedfellows.

1. Mophead hydrangeas and perennial Carex ‘Evergold’ as a groundcover. Hellebores also make a good groundcover for hydrangeas.

2. Dogwoods with hydrangeas and Japanese plum yew, Cephalotaxus harringtonia var. prostrata an evergreen groundcover.

3. Oakleaf hydrangeas with white flowers and white Japanese roof iris, (Iris tectorum ‘Alba’ ) half-shade is ideal, good evergreen foliage contrast and white flowers.

4. Camellias with Coral bells (Heuchera) planted in front of them.

5. Japanese maples under planted with sedum (Sedum tetractinum ) evergreen groundcover hugs ground.

6. Perennial to brighten the shade garden, combine with ferns and hostas- variegated Solomon’s seal (Polygonatum odoratum ‘Variegatum’).

7. Perennials for full sun to plant with roses and iris, Arkansas blue star, (Amsonia hubrichtii)offers great texture.

8. Limelight Hydrangea, Russian Sage , dwarf crape myrtle and coneflowers-summer color

Shape Up Your Shrubs and Trees

Monday, January 14th, 2013

Shrub PruningA common question that many homeowners ask is “When is the best time to prune ornamental trees and shrubs?” The answer depends on the individual plant and whether you are pruning to maintain health and vigor, control the size and shape or to encourage flowering or fruiting.

Winter is a great time to prune and thin out many of your shrubs and trees in the South. To encourage the most flowers with summer blooming trees and shrubs that bloom on current seasons growth, such as Crape myrtles, lindens and certain hydrangeas like PG types (Hydrangea paniculata selections), prune these in late winter or early spring, before the leaves emerge or, in summer, after they bloom. The best time to prune spring blooming shrubs and trees like azaleas and crabapples is after they bloom in springtime. Wait to prune roses until buds begin to swell, usually late February to March, depending on the variety and weather conditions in your garden.

With established deciduous trees, January is a good time to perform annual maintenance pruning. Not only is the structure of the tree visible (the trunk and branching), making it easier to see where you need to prune, without foliage there will be much less debris to clean up. Below are a few tips for pruning in general:

Tools
*Use sharp tools, making sure to oil and sharpen blades each season.
*Use a quality pair of bypass pruners (with scissor-like action) instead of anvil pruners. These make clean cuts and cause less damage to bark and branches.
*If you are pruning branches larger than ½ inch in diameter, use loppers or a small folding hand saw, which makes it easy to access tight areas.
*Pole pruners (most have a cutting blade and a saw) are effective for reaching tall limbs.

What and How to Prune
*For large trees, hire a professional.
*Remove any dead, diseased, broken or dying limbs at any time.
*Remove limbs that grow down towards the ground and get in the way of clearance.
*Cut dying branches back to green wood.
*When removing diseased branches or stems, make your cuts a few inches below the diseased area.
*Remove branches that grow back into the tree or shrub or rub and cross other branches. This will help reduce potential sites for disease or insect problems.

Tree Pruning*Remove suckers (vigorous shoots which are usually at the base of the trunk and come from underground roots) as they emerge. Remove water sprouts too. These usually grow along the main branches of trees. Not only are they unsightly, they can starve trees of much needed nutrients.

*If shrubs are sheared (tips are cut back) on a regular basis (this is common with certain hollies), new growth occurs near the tips of branches and sunlight can’t penetrate the dense foliage. Because of this, the interior branches may become sparse and leggy. This is when thinning is a good idea. Use hand pruners to selectively remove branches back to a lateral branch. As a rule-of-thumb, remove only 1/3 of the shrub at a time. Not only will you reduce the size of your shrub but it will have renewed vigor.
Please let us know if we can help you with your pruning needs.

2011 Consumers’ Choice Award Winner

Wednesday, September 14th, 2011

Gibbs Landscape Company is very proud to announce that we have won the 2011 Consumers’ Choice Award for business excellence in the category of Landscape Contracting. We would like to first thank all of our valued clients who provide us the privilege to work on their properties. We would also like to thank the people of the city of Atlanta who voted us as “The Best” in Atlanta.

Gibbs Landscape Company has won this prestigious award for 8 straight years in a row. The Consumers’ Choice Award is the seal of approval for Atlanta consumers that they are buying the best goods and services available.

Please contact us if you are interested in seeing why Gibbs Landscape Company has again been voted the best landscape company in Atlanta. You can contact us at 770-432-7761 or visit us athttp://www.gibbslandscape.com/request-quote.

2009 Consumers Choice Award Winner!

Friday, September 18th, 2009

Gibbs Landscape Company is very proud to announce that we have just been awarded the 2009 Consumers Choice Award for Business Excellence in the catagory of Landscape Contracting. We would like to thank all our valued clients who have allowed us the privilege to showcase our quality, creativity, and experience on your properties.

Gibbs Landscape has won this prestigious award for six straight years in a row. The Consumers Choice Award is the seal of approval for Atlanta consumers that they are buying the best goods and services available in tha Atlanta market.

If you are interested in any of our services please call us. it would be our pleasure to serve you.

Thanks Atlanta.

Time to Plant!

Tuesday, April 14th, 2009

The Spring season is one of the best times to begin that new project you have been thinking about. New plant material installed in the spring has plenty of time to get rooted in before warmer summer weather arrives. Soil temperatures are warmer in the spring which helps the new plant root system immediately establish itself.
The first four months of the year have brought plentiful rains which have caused the state climatologist to declare the drought over in Atlanta. If you are interested in meeting with one of our award winning architects please contact us.