Return to the Blog Home Page

Posts Tagged ‘annuals’

May Landscape News

Wednesday, May 17th, 2017

May Landscape Newsletter

Summer plantings of annuals are underway and will continue through the rest of the month. Our flower installation teams have been working hard since April 9th tiling, sculpting, planting and fertilizing flower beds. Irrigation teams are in full swing repairing and adjusting irrigation systems to make sure we have optimal irrigation systems watering flowers, turf, and shrubs as we head into the summer months.

Our managers are on alert monitoring for insects, diseases, and weeds on your properties. We have seen some early activity from white flies on Gardenias and Scale insects on hollies and Camelias. There are early weeds emerging about a month early for Nutsedge and Fireweed. Both of these weeds cannot be controlled with pre-emergents. These weeds are being sprayed and/or hand pulled as we see them.

Turf treatments are underway for all of our warm season turf. This round we are applying now is a liquid application that consists of slow release microbial activated fertilizer, pre–emergent, post emergent and micronutrients with iron. Along with the turf treatments, targeted shrubs will be treated with liquid fertilizer, general insecticide, and fungicide.

Maintenance crews are controlling weeds each visit along with weekly mowings.  Pruning is a big part of our visits each week and important in order to keep shrubs and hedges looking great as they are actively growing right now. Azaleas and other spring flowering shrubs are being pruned now and will continue into June.  Rhododendrons are completing their bloom cycles a little early this year and Hydrangeas are just starting to show small blooms now. Anna Belle, Oakleaf, and Macros are starting and Limelights and Pee Gees will come later. Autumn Ferns are looking great this year and compliment Hostas in the garden very nicely. Shade gardens are coming alive with Vinca minor, Hostas, Ferns, Variegated Solomon Seal, Lenton Roses, Bishop’s Weed and native Phlox. These are all companion plants and grow well in our climate.

Our Landscape Architects are extremely busy designing and implementing designs into the landscape. Plantings of trees, shrubs, perennials, and building of some beautiful hardscape areas are just some of the projects that are underway.  We have seen quite an increase in the desire of paver patios and stone walls to increase outdoor living spaces. Outdoor living spaces and recreational gardening is very popular and our Architects bring vast knowledge and creativity to each design project.

Thank you again for letting us serve you each week at your homes for all your landscaping needs. All of us at Gibbs Landscape Company are focused on bringing you the best value and service in the industry. We lead our teams each week with landscape training and safety awareness training. Thanks and have a great summer.

Peter Copses
Vice President

As winners of over 275 awards, Gibbs Landscape Company offers a proven track record of creative, quality landscape design and maintenance. Our team of highly trained, qualified Landscape Architects and horticulturalists can design and maintain a landscape that will add value to your property for years to come. You deserve the best in landscape design/build and maintenance…you deserve Gibbs Landscape Company.

Be sure to follow us on Facebook to discover more great landscape tips & photos!
Logo-Facebook_image_full

 

Creating Your Best Garden

Tuesday, July 5th, 2016

Creating Your Best Garden Landscape

Every garden is unique but the best gardens offer interest during every season. Through in-depth knowledge, experience and planning we find the right combinations of annuals, perennials, trees, shrubs, and bulbs that make our customer’s landscapes shine all year long.  Below is a list of a few of the herbaceous plants that thrive during summer and offer a long season of interest be it colorful foliage or brilliant blooms.

Duranta – Great for containers or in the ground, this unusual annual has beautiful airy clusters of blue, violet, or white flowers almost orchidlike in their beauty.
duranta

Gaura lindheimeri – Commonly known as Lindheimer’s beeblossom, white gaura, pink gaura, Lindheimer’s clockweed, and Indian feather.  This hardy clump-forming perennial is native to Texas and Louisiana. Once established it is drought tolerant.  Thriving in heat and humidity it grows 3 to 5’ tall and 1 to 2’ wide. At Gibbs, we pair it with lambs ears, duranta (above) and begonias.
gaura

Geranium ‘Rozanne’-  Commonly known as Cranesbill. Always a garden favorite for its excellent mounding habit and late spring to summer bloom time. It grows in full sun or part shade.

Geranium Rozanne

Ipomoea batatas ‘Margarita’- A chartreuse selection of the annual sweet potato vine. As a “spiller” it’s perfect for window boxes, hanging baskets and even your landscape borders. Place in full sun to part shade and watch it grow!

Ipomoea batatas ‘Margarita’

Kalimeris pinnitifida- Also known as the Double Japanese Aster, this perennial produces masses of  double, one-inch white flowers with buttery yellow centers for a very long time in  summer to early fall.  It grows 2 to 3’ tall and provides a great filler in the perennial or annual garden. Plant it in full sun or part shade.

Double Japanese Aster

Rudbeckia ‘Goldsturm’- Known to many as the iconic black-eyed susan. With bursts of showy yellow color this daisy-type perennial makes an ideal border plant as well as a beautiful cut flower.  Growing to 2’ tall and wide, it thrives in heat and sun.  It blooms prodigiously from late July to early October.

Rudbeckia

 

As winners of over 275 awards, Gibbs Landscape Company offers a proven track record of creative, quality landscape design and maintenance. Our team of highly trained, qualified Landscape Architects and horticulturalist can design and maintain a landscape that will add value to your property for years to come. You deserve the best in landscape design/build and maintenance…you deserve Gibbs Landscape Company.

Be sure to follow us on Facebook to discover more great landscape tips & photos!
Logo-Facebook_image_full

Annuals That Love the Heat

Wednesday, June 22nd, 2016

Heat Makes these Annuals Shine

As temperatures begin to rise some annuals fade during the heat of the day and then there are some that thrive in Atlanta’s summer heat.

Here are a few of our designer’s favorite heat-loving performers:

Lantana: Lantana has tiny yellow, orange, red, lavender or white flowers that mound on top of dark green foliage. Butterflies love them, and do well with little water. They bloom from spring until frost.

lantana

Cosmos: Cosmos are available in a wide variety of colors, and they re-seed easily. These plants make outstanding cut flowers, and all cosmos attract butterflies.
cosmos

Petunia: Available in a variety of colors, petunias are one of the most popular flowers, often grown as annuals. They are tender perennials in Zones 9 to 11. A thorough watering once a week should be sufficient. The spreading types and those in containers require more frequent watering though.
petunia

Verbena: Owners of long lasting blooms that perform during the hottest days of summer heat, verbenas thrive in your garden’s sunnier spots. While the verbena flower is drought resistant, the blooms are improved with regular watering of an inch or so each week.
Verbena

Dahlberg Daisy: A subtle plant that creates a low mound with bright green ferny foliage and little golden yellow daisies that cover the plant for a long period of bloom. Moderate drought tolerance.
Dahlberg Daisy

Geranium: Geranium is a diverse group, boasting over 422 species,  containing types that grow in a range of conditions, from full sun to shade. Available is broad spectrum of flower colors including pink, blue, white, and purple. They dislike having wet leaves and flowers so it is best to use a soaker hose or water early in the day to allow leaves and flowers to dry before nightfall.

Geranium

Vinca: A sunny-spot, superstar with flowers that bloom all summer long. Heat loving as well as disease and bug resistant make vinca a garden no-brainer. Available is lots of bright colors too!

Vinca

Tips to help any annual survive the summer heat:

  • Mulch around your plants. Mulch helps retain moisture and helps keep the soil around your plant cooler.
  • Deadhead. Pinch off spent blooms regularly so your plant can conserve its energy, especially during hot temperatures.
  • Container plants and new transplants need plenty of water. Be sure your plants drain well between watering.

As winners of over 275 awards, Gibbs Landscape Company offers a proven track record of creative, quality landscape design and maintenance. Our team of highly trained, qualified Landscape Architects and horticulturalist can design and maintain a landscape that will add value to your property for years to come. You deserve the best in landscape design/build and maintenance…you deserve Gibbs Landscape Company.

 Be sure to follow us on Pinterest to discover more great landscape tips & photos!

 

5 Amazing Container Annuals

Wednesday, March 2nd, 2016

5 Amazing Container Annuals
Dichondra

Annuals are the showy favorites of container gardening. Container gardening is easy and all that is needed is a little height, filler and overflowing color. These five amazing annuals will provide the “wow” that is essential for container gardening:

  1. The Baby King Tut Papyrus provides nice texture and works well for the center piece.
    Baby King Tut Papyrus

    Baby King Tut Papyrus

     

  2. The Silver Falls Dichondra will spill over the edge of containers with silver blue foliage.
    Silver Falls Dichondra

    Silver Falls Dichondra

     

  3. Raspberry Blast Petunias is a spiller with bright pink flowers (a great contrast to the silver falls dichondra).
    Raspberry Blast Supertunias

    Raspberry Blast Supertunias

     

    Be sure to follow us on Facebook to discover more great landscape ideas!

  4. A personal favorite is the Blizzard Geranium that is available in a variety of colors and will fill a container with blooms.
    Blizzard Geraniums

    Blizzard Geraniums

     

  5. The Blue Plumbago has it all with powder blue blooms, good height and texture.

    Blue Plumbago

    Blue Plumbago

 

As winners of over 275 awards, Gibbs Landscape Company offers a proven track record of creative, quality landscape design and maintenance. Our team of highly trained, qualified Landscape Architects and horticulturalist can design and maintain a landscape that will add value to your property for years to come. You deserve the best in landscape design/build and maintenance…you deserve Gibbs Landscape Company.

Pinterest

Fall Garden Chores

Thursday, November 20th, 2014

In Georgia during October and into November, both air and soil temperatures are cooler, making the prospect of working in the garden a welcome one. October and November is an ideal time to clean up your garden and to evaluate your successes and failures.

Armed with this information you can then decide which new plants to add to your landscape or which ones would benefit from dividing. With a bit of luck there will also be some slow gentle rains. What follows is a list of chores for October-November, according to the type of plant:

Annuals
• Pull out summer annuals that have finished blooming or are scraggly.
• Plant pansies, violas, snapdragons, dianthus and stock too. For the best results, prepare the soil by digging in or rototilling a 2 inch layer of organic matter. The soft soil (make sure it’s well drained too) will make it easier for plants to grow well. Space plants on 6 to 10 inch centers, depending on how quickly you want to have a full established planting. These colorful annuals tolerate frost and cold weather and bounce back on warmer sunny days. Fertilize after you plant and then once every four weeks with a “pansy booster” or comparable fertilizer. Planting your pansies in October and November will give them adequate time to establish a good root system before cold weather.
Bulbs
• Plant spring flowering bulbs including daffodils, tulips, hyacinths, and crocus once soil temperatures are 60F or cooler. This is usually done in November and December.

Perennials
• Cut back spring-blooming perennials now. Just tip back lantana and wait until spring to cut it back hard; the same is true for Artemesia. Wait until spring to cut back fall blooming perennials.
• Add some fall bloomers to your garden like asters, sedums and chrysanthemums.
• Remove old mulch and then add a fresh layer of mulch. Keep it away from stems and trunks. Dispose of any diseased leaves in the garbage. This will cut down on the potential of overwintering pests and diseases.
• Plant peonies or divide existing peonies. Do not plant them too deep.
• Dig a hole that is 1 ½’ wide and 1’ deep. You should be able to see the buds (eyes), barely cover them with soil. Fertilize established peonies with something like 8-8-8 or a comparable fertilizer.

Lawn
• Spread pre emergents to suppress weeds next spring including Chickweed, Poa annua and hairy bittercress.
• Aerate and over seed fescue seed before soil temperatures cool off too much which will result in uneven germination. Fertilize after you plant.

Roses
• Transplant roses.
• Tie up climbing roses that have escaped.

Edibles
• Plant strawberries in October and November. Space them 12 inches apart in a raised bed with a moist, well-drained soil. Site them in full sun or part shade. You can also plant them in containers. Look for varieties suited to the South including Apollo, Cardinal, Delite, Earliglow, Sunrise, and Surecrop.

Shrubs and Trees
• Plant shrubs and trees, both evergreen and deciduous types.
• Remove old mulch and reapply a fresh layer of mulch.
• Water new plantings on a regular basis. Once a week if there is no rainfall.
• Prune and remove dead limbs or twigs.

It’s Time for Spring Color!

Wednesday, May 7th, 2014

Now that spring is in full swing and blooms are abundant-azaleas, dogwoods, rhododendrons and more – it’s time to plant flowers for summer.   Mid-April through May is the perfect time to add seasonal color to your landscape.  There are annuals for sun that not only provide colorful blooms but, attract butterflies and hummingbirds too.  And, there are types with colorful foliage and flowers that will brighten dark shady spots.    Whether you grow them in containers, window boxes or mix them in with your perennials, annuals offer months of color and demand little in return.  Just make sure you give them regular water and fertilizer.

While there are a wealth of annuals to choose from, homeowners may notice that Impatiens, historically a classic choice for the shade garden, are not being offered as an option.   A disease called Downy mildew has wiped out great numbers of this plant and continues to pose a threat. Symptoms include yellow leaves, stunted growth and white downy covering on the undersides of the leaves.

The good news is that   SunPatiens ™ and New Guinea Impatiens appear to exhibit a high tolerance to this disease.  Other annuals that thrive in the shade or part-shade include Caladiums, Torenia, also known as the wishbone or clown flower and a variety of begonias.

A favorite selection of begonia, Begonia semperflorens, at Gibbs Landscape is the Whopper series,™ .  This heat tolerant variety grows up to 2 ½ ft tall and displays eye catching 3-inch flowers in red or rose set off by green or bronze foliage. While both foliage selections will grow in part-shade or shade, the bronze foliage types tolerate sunny locations better than the green leaf types.

A note about Caladiums- they require soil temperatures that are 70 F or warmer.  For this reason if you plant them in the ground wait until the end of April or the beginning of May.    For shady sites, Caladium ‘White Christmas’ is a beauty.  Combine it with ferns and hostas in the garden or plant it in containers.  For sunny locations consider Caladium ‘Aaron’ or ‘Red Flash.’   Coleus have long been popular (both sun and shade types) for their dramatic colorful foliage.  The Kong ™ series offers large foliage that is rose and green, scarlet and mosaic.  Growing 1 to 2 ft tall, they thrive in containers or in the ground.  Combine them with other flowering annuals.

For hot sun gardens, try  annuals like Pentas, (a favorite of butterflies), low growing and mildew resistant zinnias like  Zinnia ‘Profusion’ (white, orange, yellow) and reliable  lantana.   Euphorbia ‘Diamond Frost’ looks like masses of babys breath but is tough and durable.  If you love geraniums, try the Blizzard ™ Geraniums, in red, blue and pink;  great performers during our long hot and humid Georgia summers.

For a dramatic display, plant combinations of annuals that include plants of different heights, textures and blooms.  For drama, mix in tropicals like Elephant ear and Canna.   Remember too, that large containers will not dry out as quickly as smaller ones and they make a big impact.   A small investment now will result in months of color for your summer and fall garden.

If you need assistance with your seasonal color design and installation, please contact Gibbs Landscape Company.  It would be our pleasure to assist you!